About The National Association of Toastmasters


Membership is open to men and women with proven experience in the profession. All members wear the Association's badge depicting a white gloved hand holding a gavel as a symbol of power and authority.

About The National Association of Toastmasters

In the late 1940s and early '50s, the war having ended with men returning to 'Civvy Street', the banqueting world became revitalised and functions proliferated. About twelve Toastmasters who had worked before the war continued where they had left off but could not cope with the increased workload. Many men, now out of uniform, were finding that they had new talents as Toastmasters and Masters of Ceremonies and rapidly built good reputations. Those older Toastmasters formed what they thought would be an 'elite' and closed Society within the professions based primarily in London.

They were selective and many of the new breed were prevented from joining as they performed as Masters of Ceremonies during the dancing, an essential part of their capabilities at that time as people wanted to be motivated and entertained.

In 1955 eight Toastmasters and M.C.s met at the invitation of Maurice Lewin with a view to forming another organisation. Thus was formed the Association of Toastmasters and Masters of Ceremonies (A.T.M.C.) with broader terms of reference for their members and encompassing the whole of the United Kingdom.

Its aims were:
1. To establish and maintain the highest standards of professional activity and behaviour.
2. To exchange ideas and views on the whole of the profession.
3. To interchange work between themselves.
4. To have discussions on protocol and procedure with the intention of sustaining those standards and assuring accuracy of knowledge.
5. Generally to represent the professions of Toastmaster as an important and vital part of the banqueting world.

The numbers grew and the volume of work increased with it. In the early 1970s and early '80s, the necessity to be Masters of Ceremonies became less important, as the type of dance altered considerably. With the advent of Twist, Rock and Roll and other modern dances, newer bands were frequently less capable of playing the older type of dance which had been so popular. In 1973 the name of the A.T.M.C. changed to The National Association of Toastmasters thus removing the previous necessity to act as a Dance M.C.

Such has been the volume of work throughout the entire U.K. that over half the members of the Association work and reside well away from the London and Home Counties area establishing themselves as well trained and thoroughly professional practitioners in other towns and cities.

Any client engaging a Toastmaster wearing the N.A.T. badge is assured of an absolute professional approach to the function they are attending based upon detailed training and instruction.

The National Association of Toastmasters prides itself on many years providing Toastmasters of the highest standard and quality throughout the United Kingdom, and, on occasions, in various other parts of the world.


National Association of Toastmasters

The association was founded in 1954 to uphold and develop the standards of the profession. It is managed by an annually elected Executive Committee.

Membership includes toastmasters throughout the United Kingdom. Their services are available for any occasion where a degree of formality is required - from receptions, cocktail parties, weddings and dinner/dances - to charity balls, opening ceremonies and conferences.

The National Association of Toastmasters exists to maintain the highest standards of the profession and to provide support and training for its members. It was the first body of toastmasters to introduce entrance examinations for membership based on knowledge of etiquette and protocol.

A Court of Examiners is held twice a year to screen potential members on their experience, knowledge of protocol and general professional competence. Upon passing the initial examination, consisting of a written examination and an oral examination before a Court of Examiners, newcomers are admitted at Associate Membership level. This is distinguished by the wearing of a dark red collarette with the Association badge attached.

Further advancement, again by examination, is required to achieve full Member status, distinguished by a light blue ribbon. Ultimately a Member may be promoted to Fellow after examination by the Fellowship Assessment Board and approval by the Association's Executive Committee. A Fellow wears a larger badge appended to a dark blue collarette.

The Presidency passes annually, by election, to members who are Fellows of the Association. Past Presidents wear a distinguishing blue and red ribbon.

The highest honour the Association can bestow is that of Life Vice President and holders of that office wear a grey ribbon.

The Association holds regular quarterly meetings to exchange views and experiences and to educate members in the various facets of the profession. All members of the Association carry £5,000,000 of Public Liability insurance. The majority of our members are prepared to accept engagements anywhere in the world

The presence of the Toastmaster, at any of the considerably variable occasions when his or her services are called upon, is of paramount importance. In securing the services of a member of the National Association of Toastmasters the client can remain confident that they will be acquiring the very best possible professional service and that extra touch of class that distinguishes one of our members.